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There is a growing degree of speculation in the industry regarding the feed-in tariff (FiT) review that is approaching towards the end of 2011. Due to the incredible importance of the tariff to your average solar energy installation, such debate is healthy and ensures awareness of its approach. Speculation however, is not quite as beneficial, so this article will evaluate the current situation and explain what is to be expected when the review is announced and brought about.

The Comprehensive Spending Review

The government carried out what they called a Comprehensive Spending Review in 2010 in order to take better control of government spending. The Comprehensive Consultation into the Feed-in Tariff was a part of this review, and is the official name for the solar FiT review. It is carried out to ensure that the funding being spent to promote the uptake of solar energy installations via the FiT is under control and at a manageable level.

Expectations

International experience has taught us a lot when it comes to government incentives for renewable energy installations, especially solar power on a micro-generation (>50kW) level. The most successful solar industries in the world of Germany, Spain and Japan are perfect examples of this and we can review their developments to aid our predictions. In all of these countries:

  1. FiT’s were introduced and subsidised by the government to bring in solar uptake;
  2. Reviews on the FiT’s were carried out on loose timelines to control the government’s spending;
  3. The FiT’s were reduced over time and via these reviews in order to stabilise growth.

So by this example we can make one point clear;

1) A reduction in the FiT is by far more likely to occur than an increase or a continuation.

The second aspect we must consider is the degree of reduction we could expect to see.  At this point, it looks likely that the UK’s FiT reviews will be flexibly carried out to ensure the government reduces their risk in over-spending via the Comprehensive Consultation they have established. Whilst we have a rough date in mind, we need to analyse the uptake figures for a better idea on when to expect the changes.

Installation Figures of Solar Energy in the UK

The timing of the review

The government has stated that a review will take place upon a certain budget for the FiT being reached or if we reach March 31, 2012. Looking at the current uptake figures being offered by the regulator for energy in the UK, Ofgem, we can expect to reach 550MW before March 2012. This would very likely be a number surpassing the government’s budget, and we can then loosely establish our second important point,

2) The FiT review is likely to be introduced after November 2011, but before the end of March 2012.

Whether changes are brought about immediately or postponed until April 1st, 2012 is uncertain and depends on the government’s perception of the uptake and budget. Here at Solar Selections all we suggest is for people to educate themselves on their options, ensure they understand the returns and benefits for the solar installation and then proceed as soon as they feel comfortable.

The scale of the review

The other important aspect of the review when it does come around is the scale of the reduction in the FiT to expect. The growth of the market here in the UK is not expected to be sustainable for another year, so reductions between certain percentages can be expected.

3) The FiT cuts could be in the vicinity of 25% to 40% of the current tariff levels.

Only a cut of this magnitude could stabilise the spending that is at the forefront of the governments concern. Whilst such reductions would be damaging to the growth of the industry, they do serve as incentive for people to consider their options now and sign up for the 25 year indexed to inflation rates on offer.

The most important consideration with these three conclusions is that time is of the essence. We here at Solar Selections do not condone the pressured selling tactics that can be used in the industry to make customers feel forced into a decision without doing research. We do want to ensure that as part of a potential solar energy customer’s education they learn that if the review is changed and the installation incomplete, the new tariffs will apply and that they are likely to be significantly less attractive than what is available now.

In Conclusion, once a project’s feasibility and interest is established, any further delays in the decision making process serve only to expose the project to the risk of lower tariffs.

To establish your project’s feasibility and your own knowledge and interest, get in touch with us today for free, intelligent advice.

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Written by Jarrah Harburn

jarrah@solarselections.co.uk

T: : 0844 567 9835

© Solar Selections Pty Ltd

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