Posts tagged with: investors

Solar Feed In Tariff is working with a leading figure in the Solar Investment market to bring to you a stunning new investment product.

This is an opportunity for Investors to purchase a Solar Bond for 10,000 Euros that pays an annual income of 10% for five years and a full capital repayment.

Subscriptions to the bonds are available until end of November 2009.

The investment opportunity is to purchase a solar energy bond from a solar installation. The installation is operational with complete permits and licenses, utility contracts, maintenance, insurance and company administration.

Each bond costs 10,000 Euros and pays a fixed interest of 10% per annum for five years and a full capital repayment.

Spain has been one of the most successful countries in the public promotion of electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E) , particular ly wind electricity. This support has been based on a feed-in tariff (FIT) scheme. Although the basic structure of the system was implemented in 1998, it has been modified in 2004 and 2007.

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In a bid to find a solution to the energy crisis facing their country, Pakistani delegates have met in the UK as part of an alternative energy drive which has been necessitated by a fear of dependence on fossil fuels. During their visit to the UK, the Pakistani group toured various successful renewable energy projects around the country and consulted specialists in order to find possible viable alternatives to fossil fuels which have proved not only dirty, but also expensive and precarious in the region.

Arif Allauddin, Chief Executive of Alternative Energy Development Board who led the delegation on the four day visit highlighted both the need for investment and a need for foreign specialist help in developing a successful Pakistani renewable energy program. After visiting a wind farm near Glasgow, Allauddin asserted that for Pakistan, wind energy represents the best alternative to fossil fuels and that the Pakistani government has already set aside large swathes of land for the construction of turbines between Karachi and Hyderabad.

The Pakistani Alternative Energy Development Board has been keen to highlight the fact that renewable investment in their country offers very attractive returns, using the current example of a Turkish company apparently already generating power wind power in Thatta. The UK government, having already passed the Energy Bill in November of last year, has provisions that will consolidate and help attract further investment in renewables in this country. The proposed feed-in tariff, set to be introduced in 2010 will entice investors by guaranteeing a fixed rate for energy fed in to the national grid from green sources. The Pakistani delegation claims that their government is taking similar measures in order to attract UK investors in to their renewable market.

Having already been impressed by some of the renewable operations currently producing power in the UK, Allauddin made clear the fact that Pakistan will, sometime in the near future have to start generating a far greater percentage of its megawatts from renewable sources if it is to protect itself from any future fossil fuel crises.

Financial consultants Ernst & Young have rated the UK as the fifth most popular country to invest in as a result of the Energy Bill which was passed in November according to their Renewable energy country attractiveness indices.

Britain’s rise to joint fifth with Spain has been attributed to recent legislation which specifically sets out provisions for the introduction of Feed-in tariffs by 2010. Feed-in tariffs are fundamental to investors as they guarantee a premium fixed rate for energy fed back into the national grid by small, renewable energy producers.

Also, acting as an important stimulus for investors is the falling value of Pound Sterling which is predicted to reach parity with the Euro in the new year.UK renewable projects increasingly expensive as imported technologies from Europe continue to rise as a result of the exchange rate.

“The falling value of the pound is making

“The declining price of oil is compounding the problem by reducing project revenues as wholesale energy prices fall, resulting in many projects becoming uneconomical. It is unlikely that falling commodity prices such as steel and copper will compensate enough” predicts Head of renewable energy at Ernst & Young, Jonathan Johns.

The recent Renewable energy country attractiveness indices saw Germany reach first position as a target for investors and is now seen as the leading light in terms of viable renewable energy innovations.