Posts tagged with: E.ON

Energy company E.ON has announced that they will me making full use of the Clean Energy Cash Back scheme in bringing in a solar offering to its customers. The Cash Back scheme which came into effect on April 1 is essentially a feed-in tariff system offering small scale renewable generators cash for money used on site and better rates for money fed-in to the national grid.

E.ON plan to utilize the newly introduced legislation in order to offer their customers what they term the ‘SolarSaver’ scheme, a consultation, survey and installation service for solar photovoltaic products.

E.ON hope that their SolarSaver scheme will act as a sound investment product over 25 for its customers with expectations that it would take just 12 years to break even with 13 subsequent years of profit on the project.

According to the energy company, they claim that this projection is based on the fact that a 2.1kW solar kit costs around £11,350 and would be capable of generating around 1.5kWh p/a. Homeowners would expect to save in excess of £24,000 over the project’s lifespan with the added bonus of helping to offset their carbon footprint on fossil fuel energy savings.

A turnkey product is expected with E.ON stating that their solution will offer homeowners advice on the suitability of their home for solar paneling, consultancy for application of planning applications and advice for customers about entitlement to grants and other government schemes.

Phil Gilbert, spokesman for the SolarSaver scheme announced,

“We’ve all got a role to play in bringing down our carbon footprint and we’re helping our customers do that. With the long term benefit provided by the new Feed-in Tariff they’ll even make money back.

Adding, “This will be the first of many exciting new propositions we’ll have for our customers, giving them the power to produce their own heat and electricity from lower carbon sources.”

For full information about similar investment schemes offered through please visit:

In a bid to differentiate itself from it’s neighbours and other OPEC states, Sheik Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nayhan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi has asserted that at least 7% of its energy production will come from photovoltaic sources by 2020.

Having already vaunted itself as a possible headquarter location for the planned International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the Arab state is looking towards a solar future believing that once its fossil fuel resources are expended, viable alternatives will be essential. Currently, Abu Dhabi has around 8% of all global oil reserves and relies heavily on this resource as its major export. Unlike some of its neighbouring states, Abu Dhabi is looking to diversify both its economy and means of energy production as a means of protecting itself against the eventuality of exhausting their current oil reserves.

A spokesman for the Middle-Eastern state was quoted as saying,

“Many [Opec members] see renewables as a threat but the crown prince sees them as an opportunity. He [The Crown Prince] knows that the oil will eventually run out and he wants to ensure there is something left for future generations”.

The move towards solar energy in Abu Dhabi is being led by a private company, Masdar. Masdar hopes to build a completely carbon neutral city in Abu Dhabi using not only solar but also geothermal and wind power. The Masdar group is also making great strides to develop relationships with the west having already invested in British Energy company E.On and achieving the patronage of Prince Charles.

The newly established Energy Technology Institute (ETI) has announced that the innovative Nova Project will be one of the first recipients of its research funding. The V-wing turbine design, unorthodox in that it is designed to be supported in the air by two giant vertical wings represents a dramatic step forward in green technology design. The government hopes that the V-wing along with other renewable energy sources will soon be supplying energy in to the UK national grid. Recent energy legislation and the establishment of the ETI highlight the government’s desire to meet its green target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050.

ETI, made up of BP, Caterpillar, EDF Energy, E.ON, Rolls-Royce and Shell are thought to have around £1.1 billion to dedicate to similar such projects as the V-wing and will be a key driving force behind renewable investment in the near future alongside the proposed feed-in tariff. The Nova project represents a worldwide move towards greener technology. As Lord Drayson, the Science and Innovation minister stated,

“This is evidence of a real shift to green jobs and green engineering”.

Other funding will go towards researching floating offshore wind and tidal turbines around the UK and will contribute greatly to the success of the renewable technology industry in the next twenty years.